Emacs General
#1
I've been using OrgMode for a few days and it's pretty comfy. Code blocks and tables in my plaintext files are very nice. I still use vim for regular tasks because i'm faster with it. I've also started messing around with uEmacs, the emacs-like editor Torvalds uses because he thinks regular Emacs is not simple enough. 

Are there any cool things you know how to do with emacs? What do you regularly use if for? Do you compile emacs yourself or use the semi-garbage version your distro ships (for example, the red hat build does not come with tetris  Wojak ) ? Non-emacs users are welcome. We are not like Stallman, I encourage you to use whatever editor is best for your workflow
Ghanew blus Loonix
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#2
I recently transitionned from Vim to Emacs (and as a pleb I didn't compile it myself) with Evil mode. If I'm doing longer coding sessions, I prefer it much more since I can conveniently switch around windows, manipulate buffers, switch around themes, take quick notes with Org mode, etc. I know I could do these in Vim as well, but it's so much more convenient, clean and easy to do it on emacs (like VERY notably, everything is much less of a hassle and I can focus on what I'm working on) and I still use Vim from time to time for some light editing.

I still don't get the "hating on the ctrl key" thing. Don't you guys have a pinky finger? Didn't you guys use windows at some point with shortcuts like ctrl-alt-del?

How's uEmacs? I don't think I'm ever going to try it out, since I just use Vim when I want a lighter editor.

Here's my init.el: https://framabin.org/p/?d1c477fc09ccf113...MtGxLJSBXQ

There's not much in it (I'm still a newbie), and you guys will quickly recognize chunks from Mike Zamansky's tutorials.
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#3
Best tip for emacs I can give is map caps lock to both Control (on hold) and esc (tap).
http://www.economyofeffort.com/2014/08/1...ey-useful/
Here is a good lecture if you have time on some org-mode tricks
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SzA2YODtgK4

More specifically on todo keywords are also great for organising your org-mode TODO flags with someone more descriptive than TODO and DONE. I use custom ones for projects and my list of stuff to watch and read.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=15w3I6MwCfs

Oh and if you want to test out any config, rather than adding to your .init file, you can write your elisp code in your scratch buffer and just simply press C-x C-e to evaluate your lisp code. I do this regularly for testing out custom key stroke configs.
"If a company develops a software, it's likely to be evil and disgusting, and you shouldn't use it"
- Richard Stallman
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#4
I use Emacs in lot of things like :

1. Email client
2. Feed reading
3. Org-mode : planning
4. Obviously when I coding -I don't code much-
5. Ricing NixOS with nix-mode
6. muh, eShell is pretty nice
7. much more

>Compile
No, I did not, i'm so lazy. but Actually I want to compile it

>config
Actually I use spacemacs as it emacs for vimmers, and I like it.
and I hacked it but not much

>GUI or TUI ?!
both, I run Emacs demon, and use emacsclient from both GUI and TUI interface but most of time GUI
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#5
Vim refugee here. I've been eyeballing this org-mode thing since it really seemed like that one thing I've always been looking for. A simply more interactive note-taking tool and todo list (it's probably more but as a Brainlet I wouldn't know yet). So one hour ago I installed emacs with evil plugins and it's looking pretty good so far, at least functionally.

How do most emacs users handle package management? I'm currently simply adding the emacs packages as git submodules in my .emacs.d. It's the same way I've been doing it with Vim. Is there a better way or is this acceptable?
[Image: 61KDI.png]W[Image: 61KDI.png]
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#6
(06-13-2018, 02:34 PM)seville Wrote: Vim refugee here. I've been eyeballing this org-mode thing since it really seemed like that one thing I've always been looking for. A simply more interactive note-taking tool and todo list (it's probably more but as a Brainlet I wouldn't know yet). So one hour ago I installed emacs with evil plugins and it's looking pretty good so far, at least functionally.

How do most emacs users handle package management? I'm currently simply adding the emacs packages as git submodules in my .emacs.d. It's the same way I've been doing it with Vim. Is there a better way or is this acceptable?

Emacs has a built in package manager for Melpa packages. Just run the "list-packages" command for a list(it's pretty large and may have entries that don't follow the alphabetical sporting). Then you just add the necessary package configuration settings, if needed, to your emacs.d/init.el file. You can see a list online as well.
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#7
(06-13-2018, 02:34 PM)seville Wrote: Vim refugee here. I've been eyeballing this org-mode thing since it really seemed like that one thing I've always been looking for. A simply more interactive note-taking tool and todo list (it's probably more but as a Brainlet I wouldn't know yet). So one hour ago I installed emacs with evil plugins and it's looking pretty good so far, at least functionally.

You'll be surprised with the insanity people do with emacs, especially org-mode. This guy literally uses emacs to teach his chemistry classes.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cRUCiF2MwP4

Quote:How do most emacs users handle package management? I'm currently simply adding the emacs packages as git submodules in my .emacs.d. It's the same way I've been doing it with Vim. Is there a better way or is this acceptable?
emacs has a really good package management system. By default it only has elpa and is quite limited in what it contains, so you may want to add this to your init.el/.emacs/.init file (stolen from this blog). This will add melpa, which has more packages.
Code:
(require 'package)

(add-to-list 'package-archives '("org" . "http://orgmode.org/elpa/"))
(add-to-list 'package-archives '("melpa" . "http://melpa.org/packages/"))
(add-to-list 'package-archives '("melpa-stable" . "http://stable.melpa.org/packages/"))

(setq package-enable-at-startup nil)
(package-initialize)
"If a company develops a software, it's likely to be evil and disgusting, and you shouldn't use it"
- Richard Stallman
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#8
(06-13-2018, 02:34 PM)seville Wrote: Vim refugee here. I've been eyeballing this org-mode thing since it really seemed like that one thing I've always been looking for. A simply more interactive note-taking tool and todo list (it's probably more but as a Brainlet I wouldn't know yet). So one hour ago I installed emacs with evil plugins and it's looking pretty good so far, at least functionally.

There's a Vim plugin that let's you work in org mode: https://github.com/jceb/vim-orgmode

I've tried emacs in the past and wasn't a fan. That was only after a day or so. I'd be willing to try it again.

What's a recommended tutorial that includes installation and gives me a bare-bones configuration that I can update as I learn more?
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#9
Does anyone use custom themes? I use solarized most of the time, but I did the thing to enable emacs to use the colorschemes generated by pywal. Org-bullets-mode is pretty nice too. If anyone knows how to use org TODOs for anything more than TODO files in git repos then please help me. I tried to get the timestamp thing to work but something kept breaking and I never quite figured it out. I'm pretty sure it's the Red Hat build messing stuff up because the Fedora project is autistic about keeping non-redistributable software out of the repos
(06-13-2018, 05:54 AM)ArCa Wrote: I still don't get the "hating on the ctrl key" thing. Don't you guys have a pinky finger? Didn't you guys use windows at some point with shortcuts like ctrl-alt-del?

How's uEmacs? I don't think I'm ever going to try it out, since I just use Vim when I want a lighter editor.

Here's my init.el: https://framabin.org/p/?d1c477fc09ccf113...MtGxLJSBXQ

There's not much in it (I'm still a newbie), and you guys will quickly recognize chunks from Mike Zamansky's tutorials.

I don't mind the prefix keys before commands. C-x isn't that hard to hit if you have a small keyboard, or a large keyboard so you can push the Ctrl key with your palm. 

uEmacs is just the essentials of emacs but very fast. It took me about 30 seconds to compile and it just edits text and nothing else. I'm not big into nano but uEmacs seems like a step up if anyone wants to try emacs style editing without worrying about the 12,000 different things emacs can do.

(06-13-2018, 06:26 AM)nonemacsvirgin Wrote: Oh and if you want to test out any config, rather than adding to your .init file, you can write your elisp code in your scratch buffer and just simply press C-x C-e to evaluate your lisp code. I do this regularly for testing out custom key stroke configs.

I do not know elisp and I don't plan on learning any time soon. When I use emacs I sit down and set some time aside, kinda like when you sit down at a desktop computer, but thanks for the tip I'll have to remember this

(06-13-2018, 12:52 PM)DavidGabriel Wrote: I use Emacs in lot of things like :

1. Email client
2. Feed reading
3. Org-mode : planning 
4. Obviously when I coding -I don't code much-
5. Ricing NixOS with nix-mode
6. muh, eShell is pretty nice
7. much more

>Compile
No, I did not, i'm so lazy. but Actually I want to compile it

>config
Actually I use spacemacs as it emacs for vimmers, and I like it.
and I hacked it but not much 

>GUI or TUI ?!
both, I run Emacs demon, and use emacsclient from both GUI and TUI interface but most of time GUI

Wow you use emacs like Stallman  Prop . I do see the appeal of having everything on one place though. Don't worry about compiling it yourself. It takes like an hour because each time you try to configure it you get missing dependencies but the configuration script is stupid and doesn't tell you all the missing packages you need so you have to run it over and over until it's happy. I have never used spacemacs, but I did try evil mode once and it was really confusing for me because I was still somewhat new to vi(m). TUI emacs is probably the niceset part of the whole thing because when Xorg decides to kill itself you can still have your full emacs OS in a framebuffer console

(06-13-2018, 02:34 PM)seville Wrote: Vim refugee here. I've been eyeballing this org-mode thing since it really seemed like that one thing I've always been looking for. A simply more interactive note-taking tool and todo list (it's probably more but as a Brainlet I wouldn't know yet). So one hour ago I installed emacs with evil plugins and it's looking pretty good so far, at least functionally.

How do most emacs users handle package management? I'm currently simply adding the emacs packages as git submodules in my .emacs.d. It's the same way I've been doing it with Vim. Is there a better way or is this acceptable?

Org Mode is god tier. Even though I don't know everythign about Org, I do know that you can do a lot with it, like
1) add syntax highlited code blocks in your notes
2) have plaintext tables that can do fancy operations on the cells
3) export your .org file to .html, .pdf, LaTeX, .odt, and more
4) function as a scheduler and planner

In emacs land you use package management with repos. One common one is https://melpa.org . Follow the instructions  there, then you can manage packages with commands like 'M-x package-list-packages' or 'M-x package-install'. Emacs repos are nice because they are about as easy to use as apt-get once you get them working
Ghanew blus Loonix
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#10
(06-13-2018, 02:34 PM)seville Wrote: How do most emacs users handle package management? I'm currently simply adding the emacs packages as git submodules in my .emacs.d. It's the same way I've been doing it with Vim. Is there a better way or is this acceptable?
Why ?!
why not to use
Code:
melpa

(06-14-2018, 02:31 AM)tips-fedora Wrote: Does anyone use custom themes? I use solarized most of the time, but I did the thing to enable emacs to use the colorschemes generated by pywal. Org-bullets-mode is pretty nice too. If anyone knows how to use org TODOs for anything more than TODO files in git repos then please help me. I tried to get the timestamp thing to work but something kept breaking and I never quite figured it out. I'm pretty sure it's the Red Hat build messing stuff up because the Fedora project is autistic about keeping non-redistributable software out of the repos
I really want to make my own themes as I did not found a good one. but I use these
1. molokai-theme
2. nyx-theme
3. sexy-monochrome-theme   ;;simple and fun


Org-bullets-mode is is mine

Code:
   (setq org-bullets-bullet-list '("◉" "○" "⚫" "❖" )
        org-ellipsis "⤵")

I know it is dumb, what about you ?!

>If anyone knows how to use org TODOs for anything more than TODO files in git repos then please help me.
Yup I was using org-mode TODOs for Trello to make my personal planning in more beauty way (Actually more beauty but it Closed-source and SUCK.. Now I just use org-mode and some times I write graphviz for beauty purpose) Org-Trello
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#11
I use Spacemacs and Vim.
Spacemacs is a bloated emacs version but everything works out of the box and the default config is very nice (vim keybinds, and more). I use it for org-mode to literally plan everything in my life, it's sync with my phone with syncthing and orgzly to edit it. I also use Spacemacs for more heavy programming and LaTeX. I use spacemacs in daemon mode so i can open it as fast as vim. I tried recently to use vanilla emacs and edit it myself but i realized that it's painful to make everything similar to Spacemacs. I keep using vim for very light programming (scripts) or config files.
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#12
(06-15-2018, 04:14 AM)DavidGabriel Wrote:
(06-13-2018, 02:34 PM)seville Wrote: How do most emacs users handle package management? I'm currently simply adding the emacs packages as git submodules in my .emacs.d. It's the same way I've been doing it with Vim. Is there a better way or is this acceptable?
Why ?!
why not to use
Code:
melpa

Alright then I pasted the snippet from https://melpa.org/#/getting-started into my .emacs. But how would I set it up so Emacs would automatically install packages on startup? I'd like the packages I want to have installed declared in a file and have the environment install them for me (so not like apt-get & co.). For example I want evil to be automatically installed. Sorry for turning this into a support thread but I just can't seem to find a concrete answer to this no matter how hard I searched Brainlet

Edit: I pretty much got what I wanted by following this weird blogpost. The packages I define are now kind of declaratively installed, although I still have mostly no idea what I'm doing.
[Image: 61KDI.png]W[Image: 61KDI.png]
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#13
from time to time I come back to emacs, org-mode, even doing some literal programming for my config files, but idk, it hurts unix philosophy so much that I eventually just go back to calcurse, vim and other cmd tools.
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#14
(06-15-2018, 09:02 AM)smatchcube Wrote: I use Spacemacs and Vim.
Spacemacs is a bloated emacs version but everything works out of the box and the default config is very nice (vim keybinds, and more). I use it for org-mode to literally plan everything in my life, it's sync with my phone with syncthing and orgzly to edit it. I also use Spacemacs for more heavy programming and LaTeX. I use spacemacs in daemon mode so i can open it as fast as vim. I tried recently to use vanilla emacs and edit it myself but i realized that it's painful to make everything similar to Spacemacs. I keep using vim for very light programming (scripts) or config files.

100% same here.
but I didn't try any startkit -as users say-, I tried to write my config form scratich and it is actually painful

I remember said that in reddit and a user told me to use spacemacs-bootstrab to make spacemacs less bloated but actually I did not, and I happy with it

(06-15-2018, 10:05 AM)seville Wrote:
(06-15-2018, 04:14 AM)DavidGabriel Wrote:
(06-13-2018, 02:34 PM)seville Wrote: How do most emacs users handle package management? I'm currently simply adding the emacs packages as git submodules in my .emacs.d. It's the same way I've been doing it with Vim. Is there a better way or is this acceptable?
Why ?!
why not to use
Code:
melpa

Alright then I pasted the snippet from https://melpa.org/#/getting-started into my .emacs. But how would I set it up so Emacs would automatically install packages on startup? I'd like the packages I want to have installed declared in a file and have the environment install them for me (so not like apt-get & co.). For example I want evil to be automatically installed. Sorry for turning this into a support thread but I just can't seem to find a concrete answer to this no matter how hard I searched Brainlet

Edit: I pretty much got what I wanted by following this weird blogpost. The packages I define are now kind of declaratively installed, although I still have mostly no idea what I'm doing.

That is nice.
do you upload your config file in some where (gitlab, etc etc)
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#15
(06-15-2018, 04:14 AM)DavidGabriel Wrote:
(06-13-2018, 02:34 PM)seville Wrote: How do most emacs users handle package management? I'm currently simply adding the emacs packages as git submodules in my .emacs.d. It's the same way I've been doing it with Vim. Is there a better way or is this acceptable?
Why ?!
why not to use
Code:
melpa

(06-14-2018, 02:31 AM)tips-fedora Wrote: Does anyone use custom themes? I use solarized most of the time, but I did the thing to enable emacs to use the colorschemes generated by pywal. Org-bullets-mode is pretty nice too. If anyone knows how to use org TODOs for anything more than TODO files in git repos then please help me. I tried to get the timestamp thing to work but something kept breaking and I never quite figured it out. I'm pretty sure it's the Red Hat build messing stuff up because the Fedora project is autistic about keeping non-redistributable software out of the repos
I really want to make my own themes as I did not found a good one. but I use these
1. molokai-theme
2. nyx-theme
3. sexy-monochrome-theme   ;;simple and fun


Org-bullets-mode is is mine

Code:
   (setq org-bullets-bullet-list '("◉" "○" "⚫" "❖" )
        org-ellipsis "⤵")

I know it is dumb, what about you ?!

>If anyone knows how to use org TODOs for anything more than TODO files in git repos then please help me.
Yup I was using org-mode TODOs for Trello to make my personal planning in more beauty way (Actually more beauty but it Closed-source and SUCK.. Now I just use org-mode and some times I write graphviz for beauty purpose) Org-Trello
I just use the default org-bullets and usually the solarized theme. I solarized my entire i3 desktop so I needed Emacs to match
I have never used trello, but I just went to their website and it looked cartooney and designed to match the todder-friendly interface of an iPad. Using Org without any proprietary components is probably a better choice.
Syncing your org files with git or ssh > using a time management tool for soydevs

(06-15-2018, 09:02 AM)smatchcube Wrote: I use Spacemacs and Vim.
Spacemacs is a bloated emacs version but everything works out of the box and the default config is very nice (vim keybinds, and more). I use it for org-mode to literally plan everything in my life, it's sync with my phone with syncthing and orgzly to edit it. I also use Spacemacs for more heavy programming and LaTeX. I use spacemacs in daemon mode so i can open it as fast as vim. I tried recently to use vanilla emacs and edit it myself but i realized that it's painful to make everything similar to Spacemacs. I keep using vim for very light programming (scripts) or config files.
I tried Spacemacs and Evil mode but they were both really confusing. Regular Emacs, althouth the exact opposite of ergonomic, makes some sort of sense when you can figure out how to use C-h and M-x to get things done. I will probably start using a private gitlab repo to keep my org files in sync.

Vim is awesome for when you need to edit a lot of lines at once, put out a lot of text, or write something really quick. I don't daemonize my emacs so vim has a faster startup time

(06-15-2018, 11:54 PM)hurd Wrote: from time to time I come back to emacs, org-mode, even doing some literal programming for my config files, but idk, it hurts unix philosophy so much that I eventually just go back to calcurse, vim and other cmd tools.

UNIX philosophy is a good philosiphy, but if you look at emacs as a wrapper for a pile of elisp programs it still kinda follows the philosiphy. If we look at emacs like it's own Desktop environment, which can actually be done because it has it's own window manager, Emacs is no more bloated than any other DE.
Ghanew blus Loonix
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#16
(06-17-2018, 12:11 AM)DavidGabriel Wrote: That is nice.
do you upload your config file in some where (gitlab, etc etc)

Yes, along with my NixOS configs, Vim and other configs I put my emacs configs on GitHub. But I'm not gonna share them publicly here for privacy reasons, unless it's a PM Wink

Anyways I didn't expect to get this far in a weekend. My setup so far is pretty usable. I'm especially enjoying org-mode. Although I've still got alot ahead of me.

I've got just one more question. Am I missing anything if I use Evil mode in Emacs Thinking ? The C-b,C-f,C-p,C-n movement wasn't exactly something I was a fan of upon reading it in the manual. Much more of a fan of Vim's modal editing (which's why I use Evil).
[Image: 61KDI.png]W[Image: 61KDI.png]
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#17
I've been using Doom Emacs and really enjoying it. Doom takes the best parts of Vim and props them onto Emacs: Sessions, window manager, fuzzy finder, everything customizable, portable configuration and a lot more. The developer is writing Doom with Vim users in mind and is responsive to questions.

@Luke said in a video a couple months ago he was willing to try Emacs. If there is a good reason why Vim users should try Emacs, Doom is it.
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