Uncle Ted
#1
Uncle Ted  I don't know if this is the right subforum for it, but here it goes. Post anything thing about Uncle Ted. Quotes, opinions, photos, anything. Also, how can one man be so based? Uncle Ted

Uncle Ted Uncle Ted Uncle Ted Uncle Ted Uncle Ted Uncle Ted Uncle Ted Uncle Ted Uncle Ted Uncle Ted


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#2
Here's a compilation of Uncle Ted's 230 best zingers:

http://editions-hache.com/essais/pdf/kaczynski2.pdf
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#3
I love uncle Ted, i (re)read some parts of the manifesto before sleeping everyday. Everything just make sense, thats honestly the biggest red pill about modern society. Uncle Ted
This is scary how his prediction about genetic engineering and artificial intelligence is accurate and is becoming real but i feel like it's way too late to reverse the system.


(06-08-2018, 01:11 PM)Luke Wrote: Here's a compilation of Uncle Ted's 230 best zingers:

http://editions-hache.com/essais/pdf/kaczynski2.pdf

Do you plan doing videos about Ted and his ideas? I might be really interested in hearing your opinion about this but it might be too much /pol/ related for your channel.
What is your personal best red pill? Thinking
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#4
Everyone should read his manifesto. It's great and doesn't mince words.

It's also great to evangelize because it's short and written very simply and concisely. Also Ted K. is a single issue guy and not associated with any other pariah groups or views, kind of an acceptable form of edgy, so people from all walks of life and political camps can read it without prejudice.
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#5
(06-08-2018, 06:28 PM)smatchcube Wrote: This is scary how his prediction about genetic engineering and artificial intelligence is accurate and is becoming real but i feel like it's way too late to reverse the system.
When I was reading it more than a year ago, this is what scared me the most, too.

I’ve uploaded the text version here, pastebin/51Pvfmf2. Password is textzingers. You have to to download the raw text file, save it to, say, isaif.asc and run gpg --dearmor isaif.asc, which should output to isaif.asc.gpg. Then run gpg -d isaif.asc.gpg to actually decrypt it.

I post this because I couldn’t find the original online some time ago when I was looking for it.

Why have I encrypted it, you ask? I actually fear that crawlers, searching for certain keywords, will spot this und put me on a watchlist or something. Please educate me on whether I’m overly paranoid and whether this is an effective and adequate countermeasure.
If doomsday’s coming, let the earth attack.
▾▴▾▴▾▴▾▴▾▴▾▴▾



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#6
I expected his voice to be different



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#7
I recently watched the documentary "The Net" from 2003 by a German filmmaker. It shows quite well how certain intellectual elites of the 40s and 50s (oh god!) first developed the ideas behind cybernetics (influenced by the Frankfurt school among others), then influenced the hippies in the 60s who in turn started merging the utopian ideas of scientists with their own mindset, which led to today's Silicon Valley. The filmmaker contrasted it with Uncle Ted, interviewed some influential people of the 60s generation (who are now just typical boomers saying boomer-typical things in an autobiographical cloak; they all loath Ted ofc).
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#8
Here's another internet uncle/cyber dad, John Walker the founder of AutoDesk

This is probably his most famous article  from 2003

Quote: Over the last two years I have become deeply and increasingly pessimistic about the future of liberty and freedom of speech, particularly in regard to the Internet. This is a complete reversal of the almost unbounded optimism I felt during the 1994–1999 period when public access to the Internet burgeoned and innovative new forms of communication appeared in rapid succession. In that epoch I was firmly convinced that universal access to the Internet would provide a countervailing force against the centralisation and concentration in government and the mass media which act to constrain freedom of expression and unrestricted access to information.

...

Without any doubt this explosive technological and social phenomenon discomfited many institutions who quite correctly saw it as reducing their existing control over the flow of information and the means of interaction among people. Suddenly freedom of the press wasn't just something which applied to those who owned one, but was now near-universal: media and messages which previously could be diffused only to a limited audience at great difficulty and expense could now be made available around the world at almost no cost, bypassing not only the mass media but also crossing borders without customs, censorship, or regulation.

To be sure, there were attempts by “the people in charge” to recover some of the authority they had so suddenly lost: attempts to restrict the distribution and/or use of encryption, key escrow and the Clipper chip fiasco, content regulation such as the Computer Decency Act, and the successful legal assault on Napster, but most of these initiatives either failed or proved ineffective because the Internet “routed around them”—found other means of accomplishing the same thing. Finally, the emergence of viable international OpenSource alternatives to commercial software seemed to guarantee that control over computers and Internet was beyond the reach of any government or software vendor—any attempt to mandate restrictions in commercial software would only make OpenSource alternatives more compelling and accelerate their general adoption.

This is how I saw things at the euphoric peak of my recent optimism. Like the transition between expansion and contraction in a universe with Ω greater than 1, evidence that the Big Bang was turning the corner toward a Big Crunch was slow to develop, but increasingly compelling as events played out. Earlier I believed there was no way to put the Internet genie back into the bottle. In this document I will provide a road map of precisely how I believe that could be done, potentially setting the stage for an authoritarian political and intellectual dark age global in scope and self-perpetuating, a disempowerment of the individual which extinguishes the very innovation and diversity of thought which have brought down so many tyrannies in the past.

read the whole thing for some spooky predictions: http://fourmilab.ch/documents/digital-imprimatur/

Stuff we think is good like encryption and digital certificates could be used against us
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#9
Currently reading his manifesto to find out whether he's this genius that many people here and on other websites see him as or a psychopath which documentaries make him look like.
Also reading through some of his mail that I found online. Some of it is quite interesting, some pretty funny.
Anyone got some other interesting stuff?


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Laptop: Shitty Acer that currently isn't in use, will probably get a thinkpad
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#10
Read his manifesto recently and then saw his actual cabin at the Newseum in DC today, interesting stuff.
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#11
(06-18-2018, 03:00 AM)A Brainlet Wrote: Read his manifesto recently and then saw his actual cabin at the Newseum in DC today, interesting stuff.

Cool. I've always sort of wished that Uncle Ted was still out there and could give a YouTube "off-grid" cabin tour. Very curious about his setup given the time he could stay out there. His cabin was extremely simple, but obviously worked very well.
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#12


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